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Development of an Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Assessing the Public’s Values, Knowledge, Perception of Risk, and Acceptability of Management Strategies.

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dc.creator Hubbard, Monica
dc.creator Wolters, Erika Allen
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-12T23:07:03Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-12T23:07:03Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05-25
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1957/23212
dc.description Presented at The Oregon Water Conference, May 24-25, 2011, Corvallis, OR. en_US
dc.description.abstract Oregon is perceived as a water rich state; however, as the 2001 Klamath Basin crisis demonstrated, Oregon is not immune to water conflict and problems. Due to its seasonal fluctuations in water availability and geographical variation, Oregon can be considered a water scarce state, with the majority of surface water already fully, or in some places, over allocated during summer months. Climate change, population growth, and increased demand for water in Oregon are stressors compromising water quantity and quality for water users, ecosystem services, as well as limiting resources available for fish and wildlife. In 2009, the 75th Legislative Assembly passed HB 3369 authorizing the Oregon Water Resources Department (in conjunction with Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Department of Environmental Quality, and the Department of Agriculture) to develop a statewide, integrated water resources strategy, signifying the need for an assessment of water use and availability, as well as a projection for future water needs. In order to develop a statewide, integrated water resource plan, it is important to determine how Oregonians perceive water issues in Oregon. As such, as assessment of Oregonians’ risk perception, knowledge, values and adaptability to changing water conditions is imperative to plan for future water needs of people and ecosystems. Further, it is necessary to understand just how climate change will impact the amount, timing and availability of snowpack runoff that supplies the majority of water to the residents and wildlife in Oregon. We will therefore highlight results from two statewide surveys and interviews of Oregon residents, elected officials, and agency personnel in order to describe the socio-political perceptions of Oregonians. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher The Oregon Water Conference en_US
dc.subject Integrated Water Resources Strategies en_US
dc.subject Public knowledge en_US
dc.subject Socio-political en_US
dc.subject Water consumption en_US
dc.title Development of an Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Assessing the Public’s Values, Knowledge, Perception of Risk, and Acceptability of Management Strategies. en_US
dc.type Presentation en_US
dc.description.peerreview no en_US


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