Administrative Report Or Publication

 

Livestock-poisoning plants of Oregon Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/administrative_report_or_publications/1v53jx45c

Published January 1969. Facts and recommendations in this publication may no longer be valid. Please look for up-to-date information in the OSU Extension Catalog:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog

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  • Manual 1
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  • Yearly livestock losses from plant poisoning in the United States amount to many millions of dollars. Although the annual toll from this cause in Oregon is not spectacular, its increase in recent years justifies calling attention to the better known toxic plants. In this manual we have attempted to bring together all Oregon plants reported to be poisonous to livestock. It is difficult to establish, even for an area as small as a single state, a complete list of possible or probable causes of all animal deaths from plant poisoning. Some plants are toxic at only certain seasons of the year. In others, conditions not readily understood may modify the toxicity of individual plants of the same species. Many species that appear harmless if grazed casually in good pasture may prove poisonous when taken alone or in quantity. When good forage is available, animals normally do not graze poisonous plants extensively enough to cause harm. Overgrazing not only reduces the natural food supply but, by its destruction of valuable range plants, may stimulate the spread of undesirable species. Avoiding the poisoning of animals in pastures and on ranges appears to depend upon the wise handling of both feeding areas and stock. Infested hay offers a different problem, less easily controlled. Such plants as larkspur, death camas, and lupine, chemically produce symptoms of violent digestive disturbances which usually prove fatal. Certain nontoxic species may be responsible for mechanical injury, affecting animal health or even causing death. Long-bearded grasses and spiny-surfaced plants are capable of injuring tender mouth parts, nostrils, and eyes. The ensuing sores make feeding difficult, causing the victim to lose weight or even die of starvation. When sores become infected, loss of sight or loss of life may result. Plants with felt-like leaves may cause death by forming hair balls in the stomach. The plants described in this manual are arranged by families and both common and scientific names are given. Common names may differ from one locality to another and an attempt has been made to follow local usage. Additional information on the toxic properties of plants can be obtained from Poisonous Plants of the United States and Canada by John M. Kingsbury (Prentice Hall).
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