Economic impact study for Detroit Lake and the Upper North Santiam Canyon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/administrative_report_or_publications/2514nm55n

Published May 2006. Facts and recommendations in this publication may no longer be valid. Please look for up-to-date information in the OSU Extension Catalog:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog

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  • "This report profiles the demographic and economic trends within the Upper North Santiam Canyon (UNSC). We describe the economic structure and determine the export base of the UNSC. We estimate the economic impacts of a water level in the Detroit Lake that is too low for the moorages to operate and suggest ways those impacts could be addressed. Finally, we suggest some additional options for increasing the resilience of the local economy. Our conclusion is that development in the UNSC is less than would be expected, given its proximity to the Portland-Salem metro corridor and its numerous natural and human-made amenities. The uncertainty of water levels in Detroit Lake and the constrained sewer and water infrastructure in the community of Detroit have limited seasonal tourism and recruitment of second-home owners and retirees. While providing more certainty as to water levels in Detroit Lake may help attract more visitors and residents to the UNSC, those adjustments must be made carefully to avoid jeopardizing downstream irrigation or seriously affecting downstream recreation. The UNSC study area is shown in Figures 1 and 2. The study area for this project, which we refer to as UNSC, includes the economic area most affected by the Detroit Lake amenities. The UNSC was delineated by zip codes. It included the incorporated cities of Detroit, Gates, Idanha, Lyons, Mehama, and Mill City and their surrounding areas as determined by the U.S. Postal Service. Data trends were determined using U.S. census tract 106, which roughly matched the study UNSC. Census tract 106 includes all or part of every city in the study, and it avoids incorporating any of the other nearby cities."--Introduction and Summary of Conclusions
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