Abiotic injury to forest trees in Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/administrative_report_or_publications/9p2909620

Published May 2003. Reviewed February 2016. Please look for up-to-date information in the OSU Extension Catalog:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/catalog

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  • Three principal types of abiotic injury affect forests and woodlands in Oregon: injury related to weather, to soil, and to human activity. Abiotic injuries, also called abiotic diseases, can be found wherever forests exist. They are, for the most part, initiated by nonliving factors in the environment, such as temperature extremes, lightning, and wind. The exception to “nonliving” causes are disorders initiated, either directly or indirectly, by people.
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