Administrative Report Or Publication

 

Identifying nutrient deficiency and toxicity in red raspberry Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/administrative_report_or_publications/j9602102w

Published September 1991. Please look for up-to-date information in the OSU Extension Catalog:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog

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  • The Pacific Northwest leads the United States in red raspberry production. Many factors affect yield, including nutrition, weather, pests, and water. Most nutritional problems can be quickly solved once you know the specific problem, but an accurate diagnosis is difficult. Foliar nutrient symptoms can be helpful, if you recognize specific nutritional disorders and if you're aware of the limitations involved in basing a diagnosis solely on these symptoms. Different nutritional disorders can produce symptoms that are very similar to each other. Some diseases and pests also produce symptoms that mimic nutritional disorders. Other nutritional problems only produce symptoms when the problem is so severe that corrective measures may be too late. Nutrients typically found to be deficient in Pacific Northwest red raspberries are nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, magnesium, copper, boron, and zinc. Manganese is the nutrient most likely to be present in toxic quantities because levels increase under the acid conditions that commonly occur. Boron toxicity can result from overfertilization. Other toxicities are rare in the Pacific Northwest. This publication is intended to help you diagnose nutritional problems. What follows is a brief summary of the roles each element has in plant growth or development and each element's normal level in red raspberries. Also included are summaries (in percentages) from the Oregon State University Plant Analysis Laboratory for nearly 500 Pacific Northwest red raspberry samples analyzed in the last 15 years. These summaries are included to give you an idea of how common or rare specific deficiencies or toxicities are in Oregon and neighboring states. Photographs and descriptions of common foliar symptoms are also presented. For fertilizer recommendations, contact your county Extension office.
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