Knotweeds, Polygonum spp. Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/administrative_report_or_publications/ww72bb773

Published September 2008. Please look for up-to-date information in the OSU Extension Catalog:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog

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  • Japanese and giant knotweeds were introduced to North America in the late 1800s as ornamentals but soon escaped into the wild. They are particularly invasive along streams, roadsides, and waste areas. Large, spreading patches of knotweed can completely dominate and displace native species in open sunlight. Erosion can increase on riverbanks or floodplains invaded by knotweed when above ground parts die back and wash away each winter, leaving bare soil. Knotweed thrives in a variety of habitats but is most prolific and invasive in moist, open areas.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-01-11T21:17:55Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 ec1597-e.pdf: 565811 bytes, checksum: c2682596edb67d3d680c4201e38f5688 (MD5)
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