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Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions Public Deposited

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  • An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicals can simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression.
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  • Kravchenko, J., Corsini, E., Williams, M. A., Decker, W., Manjili, M. H., Otsuki, T., ... & Lyerly, H. K. (2015). Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions. Carcinogenesis, 36(Suppl 1), S111-S127. doi:10.1093/carcin/bgv033
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  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (travel grant support, P30 ES000210 to W.H.B.); Fondazione Cariplo (2011-0370 to C.M.); Kuwait Institute for the Advancement of Sciences (2011- 1302-06 to F.A.-M.); Grant University Scheme (RUGs) Ministry of Education Malaysia (04-02-12-2099RU to R.A.H.); Italian Ministry of University and Research (2009FZZ4XM_002 to A.A.); the University of Florence (ex60%2012 to A.A.); US Public Health Service Grants (RO1 CA92306, RO1 CA92306-S1, RO1 CA113447 to R.R.); Department of Science and Technology, Government of India (SR/FT/LS-063/2008 to N.S.); Cancer Center support grant (P30 CA51008 to R.R.).
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-15T18:14:09Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 BissonWilliamHEnvironmentalMolecularToxicologyChemicalCompoundsAnthropogenic.pdf: 998786 bytes, checksum: daa5e5933872b7c32fa5245a9e9e9bf4 (MD5)
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