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The Western Pacific barred knifejaw, Oplegnathus fasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844) (Pisces: Oplegnathidae), arriving with tsunami debris on the Pacific coast of North America Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/2514nr47s

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  • The Western Pacific Ocean barred knifejaw Oplegnathus fasciatus was found from 2013 to 2015 along the Pacific Coast of North America from Washington to California. The knifejaw was found in derelict vessels that had arrived on the Pacific Coast and that had been lost during the March 2011 Great Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Knifejaw were also found free living in the wild in regions known to have received Japanese tsunami marine debris. No previous records of O. fasciatus are known east of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Key words: Oplegnathus fasciatus, ocean rafting, marine debris, invasive species, tsunami
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  • Ta, Nicholas; Miller, Jessica A.; Chapman, John W.; Pleus, Allen E.; Calvanese, Thomas; Miller-Morgan, Timothy; Burke, James; Carlton, James T. 2018. The Western Pacific barred knifejaw, Oplegnathus fasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844) (Pisces: Oplegnathidae), arriving with tsunami debris on the Pacific coast of North America. Aquatic Invasions, Volume 13, Issue 1: 179-186. https://doi.org/10.3391/ai.2018.13.1.14.
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  • 13
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  • 1
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  • ORESU-18-005
  • Co-Editors’ Note: This is one of the papers from the special issue of Aquatic Invasions on “Transoceanic Dispersal of Marine Life from Japan to North America and the Hawaiian Islands as a Result of the Japanese Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011." The special issue was supported by funding provided by the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) of the Government of Japan through the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES).
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