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Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death Public Deposited

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  • Cell death is a process of dying within biological cells that are ceasing to function. This process is essential in regulating organism development, tissue homeostasis, and to eliminate cells in the body that are irreparably damaged. In general, dysfunction in normal cellular death is tightly linked to cancer progression. Specifically, the up-regulation of prosurvival factors, including oncogenic factors and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and the down-regulation of proapoptotic factors, including tumor suppressive factors, confers resistance to cell death in tumor cells, which supports the emergence of a fully immortalized cellular phenotype. This review considers the potential relevance of ubiquitous environmental chemical exposures that have been shown to disrupt key pathways and mechanisms associated with this sort of dysfunction. Specifically, bisphenol A, chlorothalonil, dibutyl phthalate, dichlorvos, lindane, linuron, methoxychlor and oxyfluorfen are discussed as prototypical chemical disruptors; as their effects relate to resistance to cell death, as constituents within environmental mixtures and as potential contributors to environmental carcinogenesis.
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  • Narayanan, K. B., Ali, M., Barclay, B. J., Cheng, Q., D’Abronzo, L., Dornetshuber-Fleiss, R., ... & Park, H. H. (2015). Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death. Carcinogenesis, 36(Suppl 1), S89-S110. doi:10.1093/carcin/bgv032
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  • This research was supported by Yeungnam University research grants in 2014 to Hyun Ho Park. Po Sing Leung was supported by the Health and Medical Research Fund of Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Ref. No: 10110021. Yon Rojanasakul was supported by NIH (R01-ES022968) and NSF (CBET-1434503). Rita Dornetshuber-Fleiss was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF, project number T 451-B18) and the Johanna Mahlke, geb.-Obermann-Stiftung. Clement Yedjou was supported by National Institutes of Health (Grant No. NIMHDG12MD007581, Grant No. NIGMS- P20GM103476).
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-15T18:00:17Z No. of bitstreams: 1 BissonWilliamHEnvironmentalMolecularToxicologyDisruptiveEnvironmentalChemicals.pdf: 2980819 bytes, checksum: 3e58bf5b3a95d364b01257a314d86540 (MD5)
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