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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/2r36v055m

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  • Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) experiences soil degradation, food and livelihood insecurity, environmental pollution and lack of access to energy. Biochar has gained international research attention, but few studies have investigated the potential of biochar to address the challenges in SSA. This paper seeks to identify and evaluate generic potential opportunities and constraints associated with biochar application in sub-Saharan Africa using Zimbabwe as case study. Specific objectives were to; (1) identify and quantify feedstocks for biochar production; (2) review literature on the biochar properties, and evaluate its potential applications in agriculture, environmental remediation and energy provision, and (3) identify research gaps, risks and constraints associated with biochar technology. Biochar feedstocks in Zimbabwe were estimated to be 9.9 Mt yr⁻¹, predominantly derived from manure (88%) and firewood (10%). This will yield 3.5, 1.7 and 3.1 Mt yr⁻¹ of biochar, bio-oil and synthetic gas, respectively. Land application of the 3.5 Mt yr⁻¹ of biochar (≈63% C) would sequester approximately 2.2 Mt yr⁻¹ of soil carbon in Zimbabwe alone, while simultaneously minimizing the environmental and public health risks, and greenhouse gas emissions associated with solid organic wastes. Biochar potentially enhances soil and crop productivity through enhanced nutrient and soil moisture availability, amelioration of acidic soils and stimulation of microbial diversity and activity. Due to its excellent adsorption properties, biochar has potential applications in industrial and environmental applications including water and wastewater treatment, remediation and revegetation of contaminated soils and water. Biochar products have energy values comparable or higher than those of traditional biomass fuels; thereby making them ideal alternative sources of energy especially for poor households without access to electricity. Before the benefits of biochar can be realized in SSA, there is need to overcome multiple risks and constraints such as lack of finance, socio-economic constraints including negative perceptions and attitudes among both researchers and consumers, and environmental and public health risks. Therefore, there is need to conduct fundamental research to demonstrate the benefits of biochar applications, and develop policy framework and criteria for its production and subsequent adoption.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-14T22:11:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 MachadoStephenCropSoilScienceBiocharProductionAndApplications.pdf: 822560 bytes, checksum: 0b0adf3961ded1d2a5bfe639377e8106 (MD5) MachadoStephenCropSoilScienceBiocharProductionAndApplications(GraphicalAbstract).pdf: 61442 bytes, checksum: 4e48520e75c28927dc9a1125e352202d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-07-14T22:11:44Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 MachadoStephenCropSoilScienceBiocharProductionAndApplications.pdf: 822560 bytes, checksum: 0b0adf3961ded1d2a5bfe639377e8106 (MD5) MachadoStephenCropSoilScienceBiocharProductionAndApplications(GraphicalAbstract).pdf: 61442 bytes, checksum: 4e48520e75c28927dc9a1125e352202d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-03-01
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deanne Bruner (deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-14T22:10:42Z No. of bitstreams: 2 MachadoStephenCropSoilScienceBiocharProductionAndApplications.pdf: 822560 bytes, checksum: 0b0adf3961ded1d2a5bfe639377e8106 (MD5) MachadoStephenCropSoilScienceBiocharProductionAndApplications(GraphicalAbstract).pdf: 61442 bytes, checksum: 4e48520e75c28927dc9a1125e352202d (MD5)

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