Biomass and fire dynamics in a temperate forest-grassland mosaic: Integrating multi-species herbivory, climate, and fire with the FireBGCv2/GrazeBGC system Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/8g84mn85z

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by Elsevier and can be found at:  http://www.journals.elsevier.com/ecological-modelling.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Landscape fire succession models (LFSMs) predict spatially–explicit interactions between vegetation succession and disturbance, but these models have yet to fully integrate ungulate herbivory as a driver of their processes. We modified a complex LFSM, FireBGCv2, to include a multi-species herbivory module, GrazeBGC. The system is novel in that it explicitly accommodates multiple herbivore populations, inter- and intra-specific spatial forcing of their forage demands, and site-specific dietary selectivity to interactively modify biomass, fuels and fire behavior across a landscape and over time. A factorial experiment with five grazing regimes, three climates and two fire-management scenarios generated interactive influences on undergrowth biomass (shrub, herb, total), surface-fire (fire-line intensity; flame length; scorch height; soil heat; CO, CO₂, CH₄, and PM[subscript 2.5] emissions), and the landscape’s fire-return interval. Herbivory’s effects increased with biophysical site potential and herbivore forage demand, but its effects were also contingent on climate and fire-suppression. Multi-species grazing modified biomass and fire within stands and biophysical sites, but regimes involving only wildlife or livestock were less effectual. Multi-species herbivory affected the landscape’s fire-return interval, but otherwise it did not “scale up” to significantly modify total landscape respiration, primary production, carbon, or the total area burned by individual fires. As modeled here, climate change and the effectiveness of future fire suppression exerted stronger effects on landscape metabolism and carbon than did herbivory.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Riggs, R. A., Keane, R. E., Cimon, N., Cook, R., Holsinger, L., Cook, J., ... & Naylor, B. (2015). Biomass and fire dynamics in a temperate forest-grassland mosaic: Integrating multi-species herbivory, climate, and fire with the FireBGCv2/GrazeBGC system. Ecological Modelling, 296, 57-78. doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2014.10.013
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-02-23T17:36:09Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DelCurtoTimothyEOARCBiomassFireDynamics.pdf: 2597873 bytes, checksum: 755331ca051cc5efadada050d88df9a2 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-01-24
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Erin Clark(erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-02-23T17:36:09Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DelCurtoTimothyEOARCBiomassFireDynamics.pdf: 2597873 bytes, checksum: 755331ca051cc5efadada050d88df9a2 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-02-23T17:35:36Z No. of bitstreams: 1 DelCurtoTimothyEOARCBiomassFireDynamics.pdf: 2597873 bytes, checksum: 755331ca051cc5efadada050d88df9a2 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/26/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items