Haplotypes of the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, on the Wild Host Plant, Solanum dulcamara, in the Pacific Northwestern United States Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/bg257g90g

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The article is copyrighted by the Potato Association of America and published by Springer. It can be found at:  http://link.springer.com/journal/12230.

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  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) is a bacterium that infects solanaceous crops and causes plant decline and yield losses, especially in potato and tomato. Lso is transmitted to these hosts by the potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli Sulc) vector. B. cockerelli host plants are not limited to crop plants, but also include many wild, solanaceous weeds. These wild hosts could potentially impact overwintering and breeding of the psyllids and serve as reservoirs for Lso. In the Pacific Northwestern United States, B. cockerelli was recently reported to overwinter on bittersweet nightshade (Solanum dulcamara L.). The present study utilized high resolution melting analysis of the B. cockerelli mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene to assess the psyllid populations occurring on S. dulcamara during the summer and winter months in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. This technique has previously been used to analyze the cytochrome c oxidase I gene of B. cockerelli, and has identified four psyllid haplotypes. Lso infection was also determined for the psyllids collected from S. dulcamara. During both the summer and the winter months in the Pacific Northwest, the Northwestern psyllid haplotype was the predominant population found living on S. dulcamara. However, low levels of the Western psyllid population were also present in Washington and Oregon during the same period. No overwintering psyllids tested were Lso-infected, suggesting that these populations do not pose an imminent threat of Lso transmission to newly emerging potatoes and other solanaceous crops in the region, unless a source of Lso becomes available.
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  • Swisher, K. D., Sengoda, V. G., Dixon, J., Echegaray, E., Murphy, A. F., Rondon, S. I., ... & Crosslin, J. M. (2013). Haplotypes of the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, on the wild host plant, Solanum dulcamara, in the Pacific Northwestern United States. American Journal of Potato Research, 90(6), 570-577. doi:10.1007/s12230-013-9330-3
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-03-18T16:38:59Z No. of bitstreams: 1 RondonSilviaCropSoilScienceHaplotypesPotatoPsyllid.pdf: 471499 bytes, checksum: 1a1f604c0cfdd5fc9d61f95035143464 (MD5)
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