Soil organic matter regulates molybdenum storage and mobility in forests Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/bk128c85v

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by Springer and can be found at:  http://link.springer.com/journal/10533

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is essential to a suite of nitrogen (N) cycling processes in ecosystems, but there is limited information on its distribution within soils and relationship to plant and bedrock pools. We examined soil, bedrock, and plant Mo variation across 24 forests spanning wide soil pH gradients on both basaltic and sedimentary lithologies in the Oregon Coast Range. We found that the oxidizable organic fraction of surface mineral soil accounted for an average of 33 % of bulk soil Mo across all sites, followed by 1.4 % associated with reducible Fe, Al, and Mn-oxides, and 1.4 % in exchangeable ion form. Exchangeable Mo was greatest at low pH, and its positive correlation with soil carbon (C) suggests organic matter as the source of readily exchangeable Mo. Molybdenum accumulation integrated over soil profiles to 1 m depth (τMo[subscript]Nb) increased with soil C, indicating that soil organic matter regulates long-term Mo retention and loss from soil. Foliar Mo concentrations displayed no relationship with bulk soil Mo, and were not correlated with organic horizon Mo or soil extractable Mo, suggesting active plant regulation of Mo uptake and/or poor fidelity of extractable pools to bioavailability. We estimate from precipitation sampling that atmospheric deposition supplies, on average, over 10 times more Mo annually than does litterfall to soil. In contrast, bedrock lithology had negligible effects on foliar and soil Mo concentrations and on Mo distribution among soil fractions. We conclude that atmospheric inputs may be a significant source of Mo to forest ecosystems, and that strong Mo retention by soil organic matter limits ecosystem Mo loss via dissolution and leaching pathways.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Marks, J. A., Perakis, S. S., King, E. K., & Pett-Ridge, J. (2015). Soil organic matter regulates molybdenum storage and mobility in forests. Biogeochemistry, 125(2), 167-183. doi:10.1007/s10533-015-0121-4
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-10-13T15:19:50Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 MarksJadeCropSoilSciSoilOrganicMatter.pdf: 1571192 bytes, checksum: 7abedc982b75a1a6e88676d9e2056f60 (MD5) MarksJadeCropSoilSciSoilOrganicMatterSupplementaryMaterial.pdf: 176259 bytes, checksum: c12ec2e9b6eb5d8d22bd80fb47b323bc (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-09
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-10-13T15:19:50Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 MarksJadeCropSoilSciSoilOrganicMatter.pdf: 1571192 bytes, checksum: 7abedc982b75a1a6e88676d9e2056f60 (MD5) MarksJadeCropSoilSciSoilOrganicMatterSupplementaryMaterial.pdf: 176259 bytes, checksum: c12ec2e9b6eb5d8d22bd80fb47b323bc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-10-13T15:19:34Z No. of bitstreams: 2 MarksJadeCropSoilSciSoilOrganicMatter.pdf: 1571192 bytes, checksum: 7abedc982b75a1a6e88676d9e2056f60 (MD5) MarksJadeCropSoilSciSoilOrganicMatterSupplementaryMaterial.pdf: 176259 bytes, checksum: c12ec2e9b6eb5d8d22bd80fb47b323bc (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified Default

Items