Nutrient Requirements, Leaf Tissue Standards, and New Options for Fertigation of Northern Highbush Blueberry Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/gt54kp67n

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  • Northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is well adapted to acidic soils with low nutrient availability, but often requires regular applications of nitrogen (N) and other nutrients for profitable production. Typically, nutrients accumulate in the plant tissues following the same pattern as dry matter and are lost or removed by leaf senescence, pruning, fruit harvest, and root turnover. Leaf tissue testing is a useful tool for monitoring nutrient requirements in northern highbush blueberry, and standards for analysis have been updated for Oregon. Until recently, most commercial plantings of blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) were fertilized using granular fertilizers. However, many new fields are irrigated by drip and fertigated using liquid fertilizers. Suitable sources of liquid N fertilizer for blueberry include ammonium sulfate, ammonium thiosulfate, ammonium phosphate, urea, and urea sulfuric acid. Several growers are also applying humic acids to help improve root growth and are injecting sulfuric acid to reduce carbonates and bicarbonates in the irrigation water. Although only a single line of drip tubing is needed for adequate irrigation of northern highbush blueberry, two lines are often used to encourage a larger root system. The lines are often installed near the base of the plants initially and then repositioned 6–12 inches away once the root system develops. For better efficiency, N should be applied frequently by fertigation (e.g., weekly), beginning at budbreak, but discontinued at least 2 months before the end of the growing season. Applying N in late summer reduces flower bud development in northern highbush blueberry and may lead to late flushes of shoot growth vulnerable to freeze damage. The recommended N rates are higher for fertigation than for granular fertilizers during the first 2 years after planting but are similar to granular rates in the following years. More work is needed to develop fertigation programs for other nutrients and soil supplements in northern highbush blueberry.
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  • Bryla, D. R., & Strik, B. C. (2015). Nutrient requirements, leaf tissue standards, and new options for fertigation of northern highbush blueberry. HortTechnology, 25(4), 464-470.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-10-13T18:03:49Z No. of bitstreams: 1 StrikBernadineHortNutrientRequirementsLeaf.pdf: 407430 bytes, checksum: c60a935e77e65243ab9eadd9191426d6 (MD5)
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