Article

 

Forest Structure Affects Soil Mercury Losses in the Presence and Absence of Wildfire Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/hx11xh05r

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by the American Chemical Society and can be found at:  http://pubs.acs.org/journal/esthag

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Soil is an important, dynamic component of regional and global mercury (Hg) cycles. This study evaluated how changes in forest soil Hg masses caused by atmospheric deposition and wildfire are affected by forest structure. Pre and postfire soil Hg measurements were made over two decades on replicate experimental units of three prefire forest structures (mature unthinned, mature thinned, clear-cut) in Douglas-fir dominated forest of southwestern Oregon. In the absence of wildfire, O-horizon Hg decreased by 60% during the 14 years after clearcutting, possibly the result of decreased atmospheric deposition due to the smaller-stature vegetative canopy; in contrast, no change was observed in mature unthinned and thinned forest. Wildfire decreased O-horizon Hg by >88% across all forest structures and decreased mineral-soil (0 to 66 mm depth) Hg by 50% in thinned forest and clear-cut. The wildfire-associated soil Hg loss was positively related to the amount of surface fine wood that burned during the fire, the proportion of area that burned at >700 °C, fire severity as indicated by tree mortality, and soil C loss. Loss of soil Hg due to the 200 000 ha wildfire was more than four times the annual atmospheric Hg emissions from human activities in Oregon.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Homann, P. S., Darbyshire, R. L., Bormann, B. T., & Morrissette, B. A. (2015). Forest Structure Affects Soil Mercury Losses in the Presence and Absence of Wildfire. Environmental Science & Technology, 49(21), 12714-12722. doi:10.1021/acs.est.5b03355
Journal Title
Series
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • This paper is a contribution of the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station's Long-Term Ecosystem Productivity Program. Support for pre- and posttreatment, and postwildfire sampling and analysis came from the Research Station, the US Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Research Laboratory, Corvallis, Oregon (Interagency Agreement DW 12936179), the Joint Fire Sciences Program (Grants 03-2-3-09 and 10-1-10-18), Western Washington University, the National Commission for Science on Sustainable Forestry (Grant C4), and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-11T20:21:47Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MorrissetteBrettForestEcosystemSocForestStructureAffects.pdf: 3348303 bytes, checksum: da0834ffc828c0a5d79eb48b10ac882b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-12-11T20:21:47Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 MorrissetteBrettForestEcosystemSocForestStructureAffects.pdf: 3348303 bytes, checksum: da0834ffc828c0a5d79eb48b10ac882b (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-11-03
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-12-11T20:21:11Z No. of bitstreams: 1 MorrissetteBrettForestEcosystemSocForestStructureAffects.pdf: 3348303 bytes, checksum: da0834ffc828c0a5d79eb48b10ac882b (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items