Phytochemicals in fruits of Hawaiian wild cranberry relatives Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/k0698935s

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The article was published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. and is in the public domain. The published article can be found at:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291097-0010.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • BACKGROUND: Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) contain high levels of phytochemicals such as proanthocyanidins (PACs). These polymeric condensations of flavan-3-ol monomers are associated with health benefits. Our objective was to evaluate phytochemicals in fruit from Hawaiian cranberry relatives, V. reticulatum Sm. and V. calycinum Sm. Normal-phase HPLC coupled with fluorescence and ESI-MS detected PACs; the colorimetric 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) assay was used to determine total PACs. Spectrophotometric tests and reverse-phase HPLC coupled to photodiode array and refractive index detectors evaluated phenolics, sugars, and organic acids. Antioxidant capacity was determined by the ORAC and FRAP assays. RESULTS: Antioxidant capacities of Hawaiian berries were high. The FRAP measurement for V. calycinum was 454.7 ± 90.2 μmol L⁻¹ Trolox equivalents kg⁻¹ for pressed fruit. Hawaiian berries had lower peonidin, quinic and citric acids amounts and invert (∼1) glucose/fructose ratio compared with cranberry. Both Hawaiian Vaccinium species were good sources of PACs; they contained phenolics and PAC monomers, A and B-type trimers, tetramers and larger polymers. Vaccinium reticulatum and V. calycinum showed comparable or higher PAC levels than in cranberry. Cranberries had higher percentage of A-type dimers than did V. reticulatum. A and B-type dimers were not differentiated in V. calycinum. The total PACs (as measured by DMAC) for V. calycinum (24.3 ± 0.10 mg catechin equivalents kg⁻¹) were about twice that in cranberry. CONCLUSION: Berries of V. reticulatum and V. calycinum could serve as a rich dietary source of PACs, comparable to or greater than cranberries. These finding suggest that Hawaiian Vaccinium berries could be a functional food. Additional examination of the phytochemicals in other wild Vaccinium species is warranted.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Hummer, K., Durst, R., Zee, F., Atnip, A. and Giusti, M. M. (2014), Phytochemicals in fruits of Hawaiian wild cranberry relatives. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 94: 1530–1536. doi:10.1002/jsfa.6453
Series
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Erin Clark(erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-06-24T16:34:59Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DurstRobertLinusPaulingInstitutePhytochemicalsFruitsHawaiian.pdf: 553046 bytes, checksum: 46476d4397f321d73645e2af561f7966 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-06-24T16:34:59Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DurstRobertLinusPaulingInstitutePhytochemicalsFruitsHawaiian.pdf: 553046 bytes, checksum: 46476d4397f321d73645e2af561f7966 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2014-06
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-06-24T16:34:39Z No. of bitstreams: 1 DurstRobertLinusPaulingInstitutePhytochemicalsFruitsHawaiian.pdf: 553046 bytes, checksum: 46476d4397f321d73645e2af561f7966 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items