Isolating the effects of storm events on arctic aquatic bacteria: temperature, nutrients, and community composition as controls on bacterial productivity Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/k3569606k

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by the author(s) and published by the Frontiers Research Foundation. The published article can be found at:  http://www.frontiersin.org/Microbiology. Supporting Information can be found at:  http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmicb.2015.00250/full#h9.

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  • Storm events can pulse nutrients and carbon from soils and provide an important subsidy to food webs in oligotrophic streams and lakes. Bacterial nutrient limitation and the potential response of stream aquatic bacteria to storm events was investigated in arctic tundra environments by manipulating both water temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations in short (up to 4 days) and long duration (up to 2 weeks) laboratory mesocosm experiments. Inorganic N and P additions increased bacterial production (¹⁴C-labeled leucine uptake) up to seven times over controls, and warmer incubation temperatures increased the speed of this response to added nutrients. Bacterial cell numbers also increased in response to temperature and nutrient additions with cell-specific carbon uptake initially increasing and then declining after 2 days. Bacterial community composition (BCC; determined by means of 16S denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) shifted rapidly in response to changes in incubation temperature and the addition of nutrients, within 2 days in some cases. While the bacteria in these habitats responded to nutrient additions with rapid changes in productivity and community composition, water temperature controlled the speed of the metabolic response and affected the resultant change in bacterial community structure, constraining the potential responses to pulsed nutrient subsidies associated with storm events. In all cases, at higher nutrient levels and temperatures the effect of initial BCC on bacterial activity was muted, suggesting a consistent, robust interaction of temperature, and nutrients controlling activity in these aquatic systems.
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  • Adams, H. E., Crump, B. C., & Kling, G. W. (2015). Isolating the effects of storm events on arctic aquatic bacteria: temperature, nutrients, and community composition as controls on bacterial productivity. Frontiers in Microbiology, 6, 250. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2015.00250
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-05-01T18:26:20Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) CrumpByronCEOASIsolatingEffectsStorm.pdf: 1382910 bytes, checksum: 450c9f30cfa011c52bd2105492c18482 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Erin Clark(erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-05-01T18:26:36Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) CrumpByronCEOASIsolatingEffectsStorm.pdf: 1382910 bytes, checksum: 450c9f30cfa011c52bd2105492c18482 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-05-01T18:26:36Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) CrumpByronCEOASIsolatingEffectsStorm.pdf: 1382910 bytes, checksum: 450c9f30cfa011c52bd2105492c18482 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-03-31

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