A tad too high: Sensitivity to UV-B radiation may limit invasion potential of American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) in the Pacific Northwest invasion range Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/k930bz86m

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by the author(s) and published by the Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre. The published article can be found at:  http://www.aquaticinvasions.net/index.html.

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  • Biological invasion potential can be strongly influenced by abiotic factors such as temperature, water availability, and solar radiation. Invasive species that possess phenotypically plastic traits can mediate impacts from these stressors, but may be unable to recognize and respond to dangerous levels in a novel environment. Understanding potential constraints on appropriate trait responses induced by abiotic stressors can aid in the management and control of important invaders. Our study explored tolerance and plastic trait response to UV-B radiation in an invasive anuran, the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus Shaw, 1802). We experimentally quantified larval mortality rates and color change responses across two larval size classes. In a second experiment, we investigated the potential for a correlated color change and behavioral (refuge use) response in the small size class. We predicted that individuals would respond to stressful and potentially harmful UV-B exposure rates with darkening of body coloration, and when refuge was available, a correlated defense strategy utilizing both color change and refuge. We found an increase in larval mortality across both size classes at UV-B exposure rates typical to both low and high elevation aquatic breeding sites (10-12 μW/cm² and 20-24 μW/cm² , respectively). Only bullfrog larvae in the small size class exhibited a darkening in body color when exposed to high UV-B treatments. Although this smaller size class did exhibit color plasticity, individuals did not correlate changes in body coloration with changes in refuge use. These results suggest ontogenetic differences (estimated by size class) in plastic color response to UV-B stress as well as constraints on behavioral use of refuge. These findings are important in understanding differences in bullfrog occupancy of breeding habitats across an elevational gradient, particularly in Oregon’s Cascade Mountain Range, where bullfrog distributions are currently limited at elevations above 1000 m.
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  • Garcia, T. S., Rowe, J. C., & Doyle, J. B. (2015). A tad too high: Sensitivity to UV-B radiation may limit invasion potential of American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) in the Pacific Northwest invasion range. Aquatic Invasions, 10(2), 237-247. doi:10.3391/ai.2015.10.2.12
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-05-20T19:59:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 GarciaTiffanyFisheriesWildlifeTadTooHigh.pdf: 1249645 bytes, checksum: 62bab105ae3d3ccd152a2a5ce0492809 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-03
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