Article

 

Mapping the U.S. West Coast surface circulation: A multiyear analysis of high‐frequency radar observations Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/mp48sj518

This is the publisher's final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by American Geophysical Union and can be found at:  http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/index.shtml.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • The nearly completed U.S. West Coast (USWC) high-frequency radar (HFR) network provides an unprecedented capability to monitor and understand coastal ocean dynamics and phenomenology through hourly surface current measurements at up to 1 km resolution. The dynamics of the surface currents off the USWC are governed by tides, winds, Coriolis force, low-frequency pressure gradients (less than 0.4 cycles per day (cpd)), and nonlinear interactions of those forces. Alongshore surface currents show poleward propagating signals with phase speeds of O(10) and O(100 to 300) km day⁻¹ and time scales of 2 to 3 weeks. The signals with slow phase speed are only observed in southern California. It is hypothesized that they are scattered and reflected by shoreline curvature and bathymetry change and do not penetrate north of Point Conception. The seasonal transition of alongshore surface circulation forced by upwelling-favorable winds and their relaxation is captured in fine detail. Submesoscale eddies, identified using flow geometry, have Rossby numbers of 0.1 to 3, diameters in the range of 10 to 60 km, and persistence for 2 to 12 days. The HFR surface currents resolve coastal surface ocean variability continuously across scales from submesoscale to mesoscale (O(1) km to O(1000) km). Their spectra decay with k⁻² at high wave number (less than 100 km) in agreement with theoretical submesoscale spectra below the observational limits of present-day satellite altimeters.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Kim, S. Y., et al. (2011), Mapping the U.S. West Coast surface circulation: A multiyear analysis of high-frequency radar observations, Journal of Geophysical Research, 116, C03011, doi:10.1029/2010JC006669.
Journal Title
Journal Volume
  • 116
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • The authors thank the State of California for the funding of the Coastal Ocean Currents Monitoring Program (COCMP), which established statewide current monitoring infrastructure; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for their continued support of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS); and, in particular, the leadership of Jack Harlan at NOAA in the establishment of a national HFR program; as well as the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation and Office of Naval Research for early support of the development and use of HFR for ocean research.
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Sue Kunda(sue.kunda@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-12-20T19:15:04Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KosroMichael.COAS.MappingWestCoastCirculation.pdf: 1533851 bytes, checksum: 4ca5d1bfa1755c363d5e445f071b8a6d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deanne Bruner (deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-12-13T00:28:09Z No. of bitstreams: 1 KosroMichael.COAS.MappingWestCoastCirculation.pdf: 1533851 bytes, checksum: 4ca5d1bfa1755c363d5e445f071b8a6d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-12-20T19:15:04Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 KosroMichael.COAS.MappingWestCoastCirculation.pdf: 1533851 bytes, checksum: 4ca5d1bfa1755c363d5e445f071b8a6d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2011-03-05

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items