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Editorial : New Directions in Canine Behavior Public Deposited

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  • It has been just over five years since the first ‘Canine Special Issue’ was published in Behavioral Processes. As predicted in that issue, we have seen exponential growth in the number of researchers studying canine behavior, and consequently in the number of new publications arising from laboratories around the world. Pet domestic dogs have been the focus of much of this new research, however the number of studies investigating the behavior of wild canines, feral dogs, working dogs and shelter dogs has also grown significantly. Given the unique place pet and working dogs hold in many societies (Udell and Wynne, 2008), the billions of dollars such societies invest in dogs each year (APPA, 2014) and the important benefits and risks associated with human–dog interactions world-wide (e.g. McCardle et al., 2010, Overall and Love, 2001), this trend is likely to continue. Dogs have also become an important model for understanding social development, cognitive evolution and human ageing and disease, including cognitive and behavioral dysfunction (Head, 2013, Topál et al., 2009). However despite our 14,000+ year relationship with dogs (Nobis, 1979), cohabitation, and many years of fruitful scientific study, it is clearer than ever that we are just beginning to scratch the surface when it comes to understanding the rich behavior and cognition of the dogs we live with. We have even more ground to cover with non-pet populations including working dogs, strays, and free-roaming dogs – populations that represent the majority of the domestic dog species. Due to shrinking habitats, increased urbanization and human–predator conflicts the study of non-domesticated canids, including wolves, foxes and coyotes, has also become more critical than ever.
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  • Udell, M. A. R. (2015). Editorial: New Directions in Canine Behavior. Behavioural Processes, 110, 1-2. doi:10.1016/j.beproc.2014.12.001
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  • 110
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Open Access (openaccess@library.oregonstate.edu) on 2015-07-10T19:04:30Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Monique Editorial FDR.pdf: 104824 bytes, checksum: d2b3fe0053f55ce2fbafcfd49d876638 (MD5)
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