A Brief Report on Predicting Self-Harm: Is It Gender or Abuse that Matters? Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/np193f87f

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  • Self-harm, which consists of non-suicidal self-injury and attempted suicide, is a public health problem that is not well understood. There is conflicting evidence on the role of gender in predicting self-harm. Abuse history also is a potentially relevant factor to explore, as it is related to both gender and self-harm. In the current study, we hypothesized that abuse history, as opposed to gender, would predict self-harm. Three hundred ninety-seven undergraduates completed a self-report survey that assessed abuse history, non-suicidal self-injury, and attempted suicide. The results suggested that abuse history predicted non-suicidal self-injury and attempted suicide. These findings can inform clinical interventions, as they reinforce the importance of including abuse history in the conceptualizations and treatment of self-harm.
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  • Gómez, J. M., Becker-Blease, K., & Freyd, J. J. (2015). A Brief Report on Predicting Self-Harm: Is It Gender or Abuse that Matters?. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 24(2), 203-214. doi:10.1080/10926771.2015.1002651
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Last modified: 10/27/2017

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