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Complementary approaches to diagnosing marine diseases: a union of the modern and the classic Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/nz806138k

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  • Linking marine epizootics to a specific aetiology is notoriously difficult. Recent diagnostic successes show that marine disease diagnosis requires both modern, cutting-edge technology (e.g. metagenomics, quantitative realtime PCR) and more classic methods (e.g. transect surveys, histopathology and cell culture). Here, we discuss how this combination of traditional and modern approaches is necessary for rapid and accurate identification of marine diseases, and emphasize how sole reliance on any one technology or technique may lead disease investigations astray. We present diagnostic approaches at different scales, from the macro (environment, community, population and organismal scales) to the micro (tissue, organ, cell and genomic scales). We use disease case studies from a broad range of taxa to illustrate diagnostic successes from combining traditional and modern diagnostic methods. Finally, we recognize the need for increased capacity of centralized databases, networks, data repositories and contingency plans for diagnosis and management of marine disease.
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  • Burge, C. A., Friedman, C. S., Getchell, R., House, M., Lafferty, K. D., Mydlarz, L. D., ... & Vega-Thurber, R. (2016). Complementary approaches to diagnosing marine diseases: a union of the modern and the classic. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences, 371(1689), 20150207. doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0207
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  • 371
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  • 1689
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  • This work was conducted as part of the Ecology of Infectious Marine Disease Research Coordination Network (EIMD-RCN) (http://www.eeb.cornell.edu/ecologymarinedisease/Home/Home.html) funded by National Science Foundation (NSF) Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases grant OCE-1215977. K.P.S. acknowledges funding provided by NSF-NIH Ecology of Infectious Disease program grant EF1015032. K.C.P. was supported by the NSF (OCE-1335657). NSF grant IOS no. 1017458 to L.D.M. C.A.B. and C.S.F. acknowledge support from California Sea Grant (NA10OAR4170060).
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