24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/tq57ns80q

Supplementary Data Appendix A ( Data in Brief Volume 4, September 2015, Pages 83–86) available online at: doi:10.1016/j.dib.2015.03.002

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  • Extensive first-pass metabolism of ingested bisphenol A (BPA) in the gastro-intestinal tract and liver restricts blood concentrations of bioactive BPA to < 1% of total BPA in humans and non-human primates. Absorption of ingested BPA through non-metabolizing tissues of the oral cavity, recently demonstrated in dogs, could lead to the higher serum BPA concentrations reported in some human biomonitoring studies. We hypothesized that the extensive interaction with the oral mucosa by a liquid matrix, like soup, relative to solid food or capsules, might enhance absorption through non-metabolizing oral cavity tissues in humans, producing higher bioavailability and higher serum BPA concentrations. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 hour period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. Absorption of d6-BPA was rapid (t₁/₂ = 0.45 h) and elimination of the administered dose was complete 24 h post-ingestion, evidence against any tissue depot for BPA. The maximum serum d6-BPA concentration was 0.43 nM at 1.6 h after administration and represented < 0.3% of total d6-BPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacokinetic model simulations, and the significantly faster appearance half-life of d6-BPA-glucuronide compared to d6-BPA (0.29 h vs 0.45 h) were evidence against meaningful absorption of BPA in humans through any non-metabolizing tissue (< 1%). This study confirms that typical exposure to BPA in food produces picomolar to subpicomolar serum BPA concentrations in humans, not nM concentrations reported in some biomonitoring studies.
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  • Teeguarden, J. G., Twaddle, N., Churchwell, M. I., Yang, X., Fisher, J. W., Seryak, L. M., & Doerge, D. R. (2015). 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 288(2), 131-142. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2015.01.009
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-11-13T14:55:05Z No. of bitstreams: 1 TeeguardenJustinEnvironMolecularTox24HourHumanUrine.pdf: 1185016 bytes, checksum: 67b8ebecdd5293120676a3a7db80d538 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2015-11-13T14:57:51Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 TeeguardenJustinEnvironMolecularTox24HourHumanUrine.pdf: 1185016 bytes, checksum: 67b8ebecdd5293120676a3a7db80d538 (MD5)
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