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Nitrification Responses of Soil Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria to Ammonium Concentrations Public Deposited

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Access to this item has been restricted by repository administrators at the request of the publisher, the Soil Science Society of America, until March 01, 2017.

This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by the Soil Science Society of America in cooperation with the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America. It can be found at:  https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/sssaj/abstracts/79/5/1366

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  • Nitrification responses of soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to ammonia additions
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Abstract
  • Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) coexist in most non-acidic agricultural soils, the factors that influence their relative contributions to soil nitrification activity remain unclear. A 2- to 4-d whole soil microcosm assay was developed, utilizing the aliphatic C₈ alkyne 1-octyne to inactivate AOB-driven nitrification activity without impacting AOA nitrification activity. Responses of AOA- and AOB-supported net nitrification activities (accumulation of NO₂⁻ + NO₃⁻) to different concentrations of extractable NH₄⁺ were examined in four diverse, paired cropped and non-cropped Oregon soils sampled in summer and winter. Maximum AOA-supported net nitrification rates were significantly higher in non-cropped (3.7 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹) than in cropped soils (0.9 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹) and in summer (3.1 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹) compared with winter soils (1.6 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹). The NH₄⁺ concentration required to significantly stimulate AOB nitrification activity was significantly higher in cropped soils (67 mg N kg⁻¹ soil) than in non-cropped soils (12 mg N kg⁻¹ soil). Maximum AOB activity was significantly higher in cropped (8.6 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹) than in non-cropped soils (2.9 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹) and in summer (7.8 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹) compared with winter soils (3.8 mg N kg⁻¹ soil d⁻¹). This study revealed that AOA- and AOB-supported nitrification rates in cropped and non-cropped soils respond differently to season and NH₄⁺ concentration and raises the possibility that AOA and AOB nitrification activities might be differentially managed to improve N use efficiency.
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  • Giguere, A. T., Taylor, A. E., Myrold, D. D., & Bottomley, P. J. (2015). Nitrification Responses of Soil Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria to Ammonium Concentrations. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 79(5), 1366-1374. doi:10.2136/sssaj2015.03.0107
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  • This research was supported by USDA NIFA Award no. 2012-67019-3028, the Oregon Agricultural Research Foundation, and the Oregon State University Provost Distinguished Graduate Fellowship.
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