Atmospheric monitoring and detection of fugitive emissions for Enhanced Oil Recovery Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/vh53wx660

To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work. This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by Elsevier and can be found at:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/17505836

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  • In Weyburn, Saskatchewan, carbon dioxide (CO₂) is injected into the Weyburn oilfield for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). Cenovus Energy Inc. operates more than 1000 active wells, processing plants, and hundreds of kilometres of pipeline infrastructure over a >100 km² area. While vehicle-based atmospheric detection of gas leakage would be convenient for a distributed operation such as Weyburn, implementing atmospheric detection schemes, particularly those that target CO₂, are challenging in that natural ecosystems and other human activities both emit CO₂ and will contribute to regular false positives. Here we present field test results of a multi-gas atmospheric detection technique that uses observed trace gas ratios (CO₂, CH₄, and H₂S) to discriminate plumes of gas originating from different sources. This work is part of a larger project focused on multi-scale fugitive emissions detection and plume discrimination. During 2013 and 2014, we undertook vehicle-based mobile surveys of CO₂, CH₄, H₂S, and δ¹³CH₄, in the Weyburn oilfield, using customized Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments that also alternated as stationary receptors. Mobile surveys provided georeferenced observations of atmospheric gas concentrations every 20–30 m, along a route driven at roughly 70 km h⁻¹. Data were uploaded to remote servers and processed using visualization tools that allowed us to constrain the location and timing of potential emission events. Results from one day of mobile surveying, September 24, 2013, are presented here to illustrate how industrial activities, combustion engine and flare stack source emissions can be discriminated on the basis of excess mixing gas ratios, at distances from a few hundreds metres, to kilometres, in the Weyburn oilfield.
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  • Hurry, J., Risk, D., Lavoie, M., Brooks, B. G., Phillips, C. L., & Göeckede, M. (2016). Atmospheric monitoring and detection of fugitive emissions for Enhanced Oil Recovery. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 45, 1-8. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.11.031
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