Article

 

WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures.pdf Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/wh246t92d

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Studies of anthropogenic impacts on wildlife may produce inconclusive or biased results if they fail to account for natural sources of variation in breeding performance and do not use probabilistic sampling at a scale functional for management. We used stratified random sampling and generalized linear mixed models to test hypotheses on relationships of daily nest survival rate (DSR) and fledgling production with anthropogenic and environmental factors that influence reproduction in the ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis). We conducted the study across ferruginous hawk range in Wyoming, USA, 2010–2012. We performed extensive field surveys of prey, vegetation, and nest substrates, and used spatially explicit data to quantify weather, and the most widespread forms of anthropogenic infrastructure (i.e., roads, oil and gas well pads) in ferruginous hawk territories. We found strong evidence that DSR and productivity were greater for nests on anthropogenic structures (i.e., artificial nest platforms, gas condensation tanks, abandoned windmill platforms, power poles) compared to natural substrates (i.e., trees, cliffs, rock outcrops). Additionally, ferruginous hawks produced more fledglings at territories with greater shrub cover and fewer severe storms during the June brood-rearing period. Amount of oil and gas development and prey was not associated with either measure of breeding performance. Our results suggest that artificial nest platforms are an effective tool to improve breeding success of ferruginous hawks and nesting on anthropogenic structures does not constitute an ecological trap for this species. Although ferruginous hawks nested in some areas with very little vegetative cover, territories with greater amounts of shrub cover produced more fledglings. The negative impact of severe spring storms on fledgling production illustrates the importance of including future weather scenarios in management planning for this species because storms are predicted to increase in frequency and intensity as a result of climate change.
Keyword
Rights Statement
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-01-12T18:38:47Z No. of bitstreams: 2 WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures.pdf: 1085542 bytes, checksum: b4daaefdc8cb531cbe283a7533214b8b (MD5) WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures(SupplementalMaterialTableS1-S2).pdf: 31112 bytes, checksum: 4119dbc330c1d78aa0e2efc17a7039f2 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2016-01-12T18:40:10Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures.pdf: 1085542 bytes, checksum: b4daaefdc8cb531cbe283a7533214b8b (MD5) WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures(SupplementalMaterialTableS1-S2).pdf: 31112 bytes, checksum: 4119dbc330c1d78aa0e2efc17a7039f2 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-01
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-01-12T18:40:10Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures.pdf: 1085542 bytes, checksum: b4daaefdc8cb531cbe283a7533214b8b (MD5) WallaceZacharyFishWildlifeHumanMadeStructures(SupplementalMaterialTableS1-S2).pdf: 31112 bytes, checksum: 4119dbc330c1d78aa0e2efc17a7039f2 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

Items