Article

 

Seed Traits and Genes Important for Translational Biology—Highlights from Recent Discoveries Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/wp988k50d

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The article is copyrighted by the Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists and published by Oxford University Press. It can be found at:  http://pcp.oxfordjournals.org/. To the best of our knowledge, one or more authors of this paper were federal employees when contributing to this work.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Seeds provide food, feed, fiber and fuel. They are also an important delivery system of genetic information, which is essential for the survival of wild species in ecosystems and the production of agricultural crops. In this review, seed traits and genes that are potentially important for agricultural applications are discussed. Over the long period of crop domestication, seed traits have been modified through intentional or unintentional selections. While most selections have led to seed traits favorable for agricultural consumption, such as larger seeds with higher nutritional value than the wild type, other manipulations in modern breeding sometimes led to negative traits, such as vivipary, precocious germination on the maternal plant or reduced seed vigor, as a side effect during the improvement of other characteristics. Greater effort is needed to overcome these problems that have emerged as a consequence of crop improvement. Seed biology researchers have characterized the function of many genes in the last decade, including those associated with seed domestication, which may be useful in addressing critical issues in modern agriculture, such as the prevention of vivipary and seed shattering or the enhancement of yields. Recent discoveries in seed biology research are highlighted in this review, with an emphasis on their potential for translational biology.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Cristina Martínez-Andújar, Ruth C. Martin, and Hiroyuki Nonogaki. Seed Traits and Genes Important for Translational Biology—Highlights from Recent Discoveries. Plant and Cell Physiology, (2012), 53(1): 5-15. doi:10.1093/pcp/pcr112
Journal Title
Journal Volume
  • 53
Journal Issue/Number
  • 1
Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • This work was supported by the US–Israel Binational Science Foundation [BSF-2009173 to H.N.]; the Fundacio´n Se´neca: Agencia Regional de Ciencia y Tecnologı´a, Regio´n de Murcia, Spain [to C.M.-A.].
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-04-09T18:59:37Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 NonogakiHiroyukiHorticultureSeedTraitsGenes.pdf: 903676 bytes, checksum: d820c70eb4c66de65089eeec27c1dab4 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012-01
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-09T18:59:37Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 NonogakiHiroyukiHorticultureSeedTraitsGenes.pdf: 903676 bytes, checksum: d820c70eb4c66de65089eeec27c1dab4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deanne Bruner (deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-09T18:58:33Z No. of bitstreams: 1 NonogakiHiroyukiHorticultureSeedTraitsGenes.pdf: 903676 bytes, checksum: d820c70eb4c66de65089eeec27c1dab4 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items