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Do hassles and uplifts trajectories predict mortality? Longitudinal findings from the VA Normative Aging Study Public Deposited

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  • We examined whether longitudinal patterns of hassles and uplifts trajectories predicted mortality, using a sample of 1315 men from the VA Normative Aging Study (mean age = 65.31, SD = 7.6). In prior work, we identified different trajectory classes of hassles and uplifts exposure and intensity scores over a period of 16 years. In this study, we used the probabilities of these exposure and intensity class memberships to examine their ability to predict mortality. Men with higher probabilities of high hassle intensity trajectory class and high uplift intensity class had higher mortality risks. In a model combining the probabilities of hassle and uplift intensities, the probability of high intensity hassle class membership significantly increased the risk of mortality. This suggests that appraisals of hassles intensity are better predictors of mortality than simple exposure measures, and that uplifts have no independent effects.
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  • Jeong, Y. J., Aldwin, C. M., Igarashi, H., & Spiro III, A. (2016). Do hassles and uplifts trajectories predict mortality? Longitudinal findings from the VA Normative Aging Study. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 39(3), 408-419. doi:10.1007/s10865-015-9703-9
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  • 39
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  • 3
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  • This study was funded by NIH Grants R01 AG032037, AG002287, and AG018436, as well as a Merit Review and a Senior Research Career Scientist Award from the CSR&D Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs. The NAS is a research component of the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC) and is supported by VA CSP/ERIC. This study was also supported by research funds of Chonbuk National University in 2014.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2016-06-15T14:30:34Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 JeongDoHasslesUplifts.pdf: 643086 bytes, checksum: 45a586a975c0f4c5abf04c9caf44186b (MD5) JeongDoHasslesUpliftsApendix.pdf: 58313 bytes, checksum: f91e97bd5034781a3d463267ea309fff (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-06
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-15T14:30:14Z No. of bitstreams: 2 JeongDoHasslesUplifts.pdf: 643086 bytes, checksum: 45a586a975c0f4c5abf04c9caf44186b (MD5) JeongDoHasslesUpliftsApendix.pdf: 58313 bytes, checksum: f91e97bd5034781a3d463267ea309fff (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-15T14:30:34Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 JeongDoHasslesUplifts.pdf: 643086 bytes, checksum: 45a586a975c0f4c5abf04c9caf44186b (MD5) JeongDoHasslesUpliftsApendix.pdf: 58313 bytes, checksum: f91e97bd5034781a3d463267ea309fff (MD5)

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