Small-Scale Fisheries and Global Subsidy Reform Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/2v23vz528

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • Subsidies are most often discussed within global fora (such as the World Trade Organiza­tion) in terms of concerns over trade distortions, if some countries gain an unfair advantage, through their subsidies, over unsubsidized industry elsewhere. In fisheries, this concern is matched by an en­vironmental argument – that fish stock depletion has been driven in part by high levels of fishing subsidies. While these two aspects have garnered most attention, subsi­dies are also recognized to have impacts on human development. This recognition partially explains the broader move to treat subsidies differ­ently between developing and developed countries, acknowledging their differing histories and needs. In addition, within the fishery sector spe­cifically, there is an understanding of two key realities: (1) that the negative aspects of subsidies are largely found in industrial rather than small-scale fisheries, and (2) that certain subsidies may provide support for the role of small-scale fisheries in pursuing the Sustainable Development Goals, and implementing the new Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries. Accordingly, fishery subsidies, particularly in small-scale fisheries, might be best evaluated using three criteria: trade distortions, environ­mental impacts, and the extent of contributing to or impeding progress toward human development. A win-win-win situation in small-scale fisheries will be one in which a subsidy is minimally trade distorting, and simultaneously supports human development needs and produces conserva­tion benefits (or at least avoids negative environmental and over-fishing impacts). This presentation explores global policy directions in subsidy reforms that support small-scale fisheries, and their associated social, economic, and human rights.
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  • 0976343290

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