Using evolutionary economics to explain predator-prey anomalies in the fisheries or explaining micky mouse's ears Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/3n2040590

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  • The development of several sub-fields of general economics, including those of bounded rationality, institutional economics and the evolutionary economics, has expanded the scope and intensity of the dialogue both within economics, as well as between economists and other scientists. One of the more important preoccupations of early evolutionary economics was the development of an aggregate growth theory with more realistic micro-foundations of firm behavior. Now theorizing and modeling of evolutionary economic processes is also a preoccupation of chaos theorists. Fleet evolution in a competitive fishery displays many features of interest, one of which is the strong similarity with predator-prey relationships in population biology. However, aggregate data on Heel behavior sometimes reveal humps or ears ' which, when fitted to differential equations explaining stock and fleet evolution, are smoothed. Such smoothing reveals the dominant process, but it filters out other important secondary processes of interest to resource managers. These secondary processes can include price effects, technological innovation and diffusion, and complexities in the ecosystem that change stock parameters. This paper discusses how an evolutionary economics approach to modeling firm behavior might be useful in understanding important anomalies in the predator-prey trajectory. It concludes with a discussion on the management importance of micro-level phenomena on the ultimate trajectory taken by the fleet in response to the stock The conclusions are that while the dominant predator-prey process is important In explaining competitive dynamics and resource depletion, unexpected ecological phenomena and micro-level behavior of individual boat owners are also important reasons for precipitous collapses in certain fisheries. This may suggest substantial revision in the theoretical and policy tools used to manage fisheries.
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  • Wilson, James R. 1996. Using evolutionary economics to explain predator-prey anomalies in the fisheries or explaining micky mouse's ears. In: Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 1-4, 1996, Marrakech, Morocco. Compiled by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, 2002. CD ROM.
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