Status of Nile perch Lates niloticus fishery in Lake Victoria Public Deposited

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  • Lake Victoria, with 68,800km2 of surface area, is the largest tropical lake and supports Africa‚ largest fishery. The Lake‚ waters are divided among three countries (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania). Estimates indicate that riparian states earn US$500-US$550 million annually from fish catches from the lake. Fish biomass monitoring using acoustics and catch assessment surveys have been conducted in Lake Victoria under the LVRP (1999-2002) and IFMP (2005-2006) projects. Information from recent fishery dependent and independent methods suggests the biomass of the most important commercial fish species of Lake Victoria; the Nile perch is stabilizing (LVFO Stock Assessment RWG, 2009, CAS and Hydro-acoustic reports). Estimated biomass of Nile perch from the recent seven surveys since August 2007 has remained fairly comparable. The lowest was recorded in August 2008, just below 0.25 m t while the rest are all around 0.35 m t. Comparing the most recent surveys (2009-2011) to the surveys conducted from August 2005 to February 2007, there has been a 50% drop in biomass. The observed catch rates for the main craft gear combination targeting Nile perch species are apparently lower in the later surveys (2010-2011) than they were nine years ago. The most important gears in the Nile perch fishery are gillnets and long lines. Estimates from catch assessment survey indicate that the average annual catch in 2007 was 234,000 t, a decline from 287,000 t in 2005.
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  • Owili, M., Nyamweya, C. Status of Nile perch Lates niloticus fishery in Lake Victoria. In: Visible Possibilities: The Economics of Sustainable Fisheries, Aquaculture and Seafood Trade: Proceedings of the Sixteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 16-20, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Edited by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2012.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Martin Eberle Jr (eberlem@onid.orst.edu) on 2013-11-12T21:14:31Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Owili-227.pdf: 13620 bytes, checksum: dc36815c2a830dfdb6d38b72714c108f (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Rejected by Janet Webster(janet.webster@oregonstate.edu), reason: Martin, Looks like the abstract was cut off. Can you fix or do we need to edit it slightly? -Janet on 2013-11-06T00:46:26Z (GMT)
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