Balancing Carrots and Sticks for Fisheries Management: The Case of Hilsa Management in Bangladesh Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/6d56zz29z

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • Traditional approaches to halt decline of fisheries resources focus on regulating against destructive practices, but to little effect. A more effective strategy could be to establish a direct economic incentive mechanism such as payments or compensation schemes, or to incorporate such payments into existing regulatory mechanisms. Examples from terrestrial environments, and a few from aquatic environments, suggest that economic incentive-based mechanisms can work to protect both livelihoods and environments. A scheme offering payments for hilsa conservation in Bangladesh offers a rare example of a direct economic incentive mechanism being used for sustainable fisheries management. Hilsa is one of the most important single-species fisheries in the Bay of Bengal. More than half a million people depend on it for their livelihood and 250 million Bengali people depend on it for nutrition. But in the face of over-exploitation both scientists and policymakers fear a collapse of the fish stock in the near future. This has led the Bangladeshi government to declare five sites in the fishing grounds as ‘hilsa sanctuaries', where fishing is banned during the breeding season. To compensate for lost earnings, the government provides ‘affected' fisher communities, which total 212,000 households, with food and alternative income-generating activities. In this presentation we will answer the following questions: 1- How to minimise unintended negative impacts on local economies? 2- How to ensure effective targeting so that the poor do not lose out? 3- How to ensure financial sustainability of the scheme?
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  • 0976343290

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