In Cod We Trust: Who Are Qualified to Decide Regarding Fisheries Management? Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/6d570138n

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Trust is a key aspect in managing fisheries. Individuals with low levels of political trust are more likely to accept illegal behavior. Institutional trust depends on beliefs about institutional behavior and on how competent an institution appears to be. The success of fisheries management depends on how fishermen perceive it. Fishers can even discourage the implementation of the regulations if refusing support. Fishers respect and follow their own self-imposed operational rules to much a greater extent than rules coming from authorities. Trust within the fishing communities can make more fishers to comply with regulations which reduce the cost to monitor the individual fisher. While trust is necessary it is not alone sufficient to make fishermen comply with government regulations. In this study we analyze levels of trust between various stakeholders in fisheries. Specifically, we are interested in whether different stakeholders in fisheries consider others and themselves to have sufficient knowledge to decide regarding fisheries management. We address these questions using data from a regional survey in Sweden sent to the general public, recreational and commercial fishermen, and desk officers at three different agencies responsible for environmental, water and fisheries management, respectively. The general public and recreational fishers trust the authorities to have sufficient knowledge to manage the fisheries. However, commercial fishers do mistrust the authorities. We note that authorities mistrust the general public to have sufficient knowledge. Further, we find that all respondents are more likely to believe that they themselves have sufficient knowledge than people in general.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Created
Date Issued
Conference Name
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Michael Boock(michael.boock@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-03-02T21:52:23Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Eggert388ppt.pdf: 361781 bytes, checksum: cd59c890885921346ac7f9144ee3e364 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by IIFET Student Assistant (iifetstudentassistant@gmail.com) on 2017-03-02T21:49:41Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Eggert388ppt.pdf: 361781 bytes, checksum: cd59c890885921346ac7f9144ee3e364 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2017-03-02T21:52:23Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Eggert388ppt.pdf: 361781 bytes, checksum: cd59c890885921346ac7f9144ee3e364 (MD5)
ISBN
  • 0976343290

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items