Conference Proceedings Or Journal

 

Fisheries in the Blue Economy: Challenges for Small Island Developing States Public Deposited

https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/794082223

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • This research is part of a UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office initiative to develop a roadmap for the Blue Economy in Small Island Developing States (SIDS).  The research first considers the unique characteristics of SIDS and the continuing difficulties and challenges of traditional methods of capture fisheries management. The key features of a blue economy approach to fisheries management are then articulated, highlighting what is ‘new’ about the blue economy approach to management.  The potential benefits that could result from adopting such an approach are considered. Case studies of the Maldives, Seychelles and Fiji show how these SIDS have adopted many blue economy strategies and associated activities. The research argues that in order for capture fisheries to contribute to enhanced economic and social benefits, while minimising environmental degradation and adapting to climate change, three mutually reinforcing and linked blue economy strategies should be: 1.    A more integrated approach by increasing participation, transparency, and partnerships both within the sector, and with other sectors. 2.    Minimising negative environmental impacts and carbon footprint of the fisheries by improving waste management, reduced emissions and a shift from harmful subsidies towards sustainability incentives. 3.    Increased value addition through technical and other innovations that increase business productivity, reduce waste, and get more from a limited resource. A wide range of activities and outputs are proposed, which when coupled with capacity development and additional support to ensure enabling conditions, will deliver these ‘blue economy’ strategies.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by IIFET Student Assistant (iifetstudentassistant@gmail.com) on 2017-02-22T23:52:28Z No. of bitstreams: 2 Cappell239ppt.pdf: 734650 bytes, checksum: 67fcce3eae800d6b34b6920a597d7d83 (MD5) Cappell239.pdf: 182454 bytes, checksum: d56c6889fe3cbffc116140ffec13a3cb (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Michael Boock(michael.boock@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-02-23T20:39:55Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 Cappell239ppt.pdf: 734650 bytes, checksum: 67fcce3eae800d6b34b6920a597d7d83 (MD5) Cappell239.pdf: 182454 bytes, checksum: d56c6889fe3cbffc116140ffec13a3cb (MD5)
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  • 0976343290

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