The Bioeconomics of Soft Shell Crab: Evaluating the Impacts of Changing Season Length in Oregon's Dungeness Crab Fishery Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/bg257j92f

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • The Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) fishery is one of the most valuable single species fishery in Oregon, with an average annual ex-vessel value of $45 million from 2004-2014. The fishery is managed using a "3-S" (minimum retention size, male retention only, season length) management paradigm. In addition, fleet capacity has been restricted since 1996, and a system of three tiers of pot limits was implemented in 2006. While a significant literature exists on the biology of the Dungeness crab, and despite the fishery's economic importance to the West coast of the U.S., relatively little is known about either the population dynamics of this stock, the economic behavior of the crab fleet, impacts of crab discards on future catch and biomass, and the economic performance of the fishery relative to its potential. To help us better understand the interaction of the biological stock and industry behavior we develop a bioeconomic model of the Oregon Dungeness crab fishery. The model combines an empirically estimated duration model of intra-season vessel exit behavior with a cohort-based biological representation of the crab stock into a bioeconomic simulation model. Using a Monte Carlo framework, we then examine the potential economic impacts of adjusting: 1) effort levels throughout the season, and 2) season length and timing. The economic performance of the fishery under its current management structure is then compared to the potential performance of the fishery under alternate management options.
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  • 0976343290

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