Estimation of Heterogeneous Responses to Size Variation in the Bering Sea Pollock Fishery Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/cn69m822b

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Bioeconomic modeling of an age-structured population typically assumes the value of a fish increases with size; the fish increase in weight as they age, and harvesters may receive an increase in the price per weight. When size selectivity is possible, traditional policy such as individual quotas may still result in economically inefficient outcomes. In this paper, we examine whether harvesters have incentives to target larger fish in the Eastern Bering Sea walleye pollock catcher-processor fleet. While there exists anecdotal evidence in industry reports and news articles that the price per kilogram for larger pollock increases with size, we empirically describe the relationship between the value the harvester receives for each kilogram they catch, and the size of the fish the harvester targets. While on average harvesters derive a greater return per caught weight for larger sizes, this size effect is heterogeneous depending on the product mix the catcher-processor produces. By identifying vessel group membership, we can show how vessels that produce a larger share of fillet have a greater return from larger fish than vessels that produce a larger share of surimi. This implies that relationships between size and price, and incentives to selectively target, depend on the existing processing capital. Importantly, distributional impacts to fishery participants, and efficacy of management solutions, will vary across fisheries as a function of each fishery's processing capital.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Created
Date Issued
Conference Name
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2017-02-24T00:01:45Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Chen461ppt.pdf: 1296891 bytes, checksum: bee344e057256ba8088ae260ab7bfc59 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by IIFET Student Assistant (iifetstudentassistant@gmail.com) on 2017-02-23T23:42:41Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Chen461ppt.pdf: 1296891 bytes, checksum: bee344e057256ba8088ae260ab7bfc59 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Michael Boock(michael.boock@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-02-24T00:01:45Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Chen461ppt.pdf: 1296891 bytes, checksum: bee344e057256ba8088ae260ab7bfc59 (MD5)
ISBN
  • 0976343290

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 10/05/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items