The substitutability among Japanese, Taiwanese and South Korean frozen tuna Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/cr56n2262

Research Paper

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Japan is the number 1 country in the world in terms of tuna harvest[1]. For example, it started from about 294,961 tons in 1975, then reached its peak at 371,103 tons in 1985. Although the harvest declined since 1985, it bounced back for the recent years and reached 343,611 tons in 1993 (Table 1 and Figure I). While Japan has the largest tuna harvest in the world, it relies on import for both fresh and frozen tuna to meet its domestic demand. The amount imported has increased from about 84,703 tons in 1981 to around 273,399 tons in 1993 (Table 2) of which the frozen tuna has increased from about 73,000 tons to about 184,000 tons. For domestically demanded frozen tuna, Thunnus albacares (i.e. Yellow Fin tuna) and Thunnus obsess (i.e. Big Eye tuna) are the two major categories. Other than domestic supply, Taiwan and South Korea are the two major suppliers among about fifty countries. Starting 1990, Taiwan exceeded South Korea and became the largest foreign frozen tuna supplier to Japan. The Taiwanese tuna deep-sea long-line fisheries has been an important part of its fishery industry. Compared to Taiwanese deep-sea fishery, the Tuna fishery took about 50% of the value before 1991. Recently, the ratio increased to 62.9% (1992), (75.0) (1993) and dropped a little bit to 68.3% in 1994 (Table 3). As compared to the fishery industry as a whole, Taiwanese tuna fishery took more than 20% of the total value for the past several years (Table 4).
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Sun, Lih-Chyun, Hsi-Chiang Liu, Li-Fen Lei, Wann-Chang Shyu. 1996. The substitutability among Japanese, Taiwanese and South Korean frozen tuna. Peer Review: No. In: Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 1-4, 1996, Marrakech, Morocco. Compiled by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, 2002. CD ROM.
Conference Name
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Katy Davis (kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2015-10-02T22:18:09Z No. of bitstreams: 1 The substitutability among Japanese.pdf: 1434432 bytes, checksum: c17f9fc1f14aa6d36ff0683cf079f6f0 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-10-02T23:09:55Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 The substitutability among Japanese.pdf: 1434432 bytes, checksum: c17f9fc1f14aa6d36ff0683cf079f6f0 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2002
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Katy Davis(kdscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2015-10-02T23:09:55Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 The substitutability among Japanese.pdf: 1434432 bytes, checksum: c17f9fc1f14aa6d36ff0683cf079f6f0 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items