Long Term Gain from Medium Term Pain - Lessons for Fisheries Managers from Integrated Ecosystem Based and Collaborative Approaches in New Zealand Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/f7623f38z

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Aotearoa New Zealand has a long running and well managed quota management system for its fisheries, yet still faces challenges in terms of designing and implementing integrated ecosystem based approaches. Two recent processes have challenged the norm. In the Te Korowai case, issues surrounding the coastal marine environment were managed through an inclusive process based on a Maori concept of ‘gifting and gaining', e.g., commercial fishers gifted some space but gained certainty over other space allocation, while conservation groups gained a marine reserve while gifting their preferred reserve location. Specific government legislation has been passed to implement the entire agreement. In the case of the Marlborough Sounds there are multiple concerns, with many specifically about fisheries issues, but clearly also linked to land use practices. An inclusive process, based around Natural Capital principles, led by a commercial fishing company, Aotearoa Fisheries, working collaboratively with key government agencies and the Sustainable Business Council is now embarking on an ongoing collaborative process that is whole-of-ecosystem based and fully inclusive. Using a comparative policy analysis framework the drivers of both processes are explored and compared to previous approaches in the same locations. The findings indicate that while fully inclusive and more ecosystem based processes take time, and resources, and are stressful, they provide more durable outcomes which are also more likely to address key processes of change.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Created
Date Issued
Conference Name
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by IIFET Student Assistant (iifetstudentassistant@gmail.com) on 2017-03-02T23:59:52Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Hughey29ppt.pdf: 1154956 bytes, checksum: 423d65c32903030ec5121da82638f1d6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Michael Boock(michael.boock@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-03-03T17:04:41Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Hughey29ppt.pdf: 1154956 bytes, checksum: 423d65c32903030ec5121da82638f1d6 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2017-03-03T17:04:41Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Hughey29ppt.pdf: 1154956 bytes, checksum: 423d65c32903030ec5121da82638f1d6 (MD5)
ISBN
  • 0976343290

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/27/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items