The Sustainable Seafood Movement Is a Governance Concert, with the Audience Playing a Key Role Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/h415pc60r

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

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  • The world’s fisheries are widely considered to be in ecological crisis. One governance solution is private standards, including ecolabelling. The conventional logic is that ecolabels meet consumer demand for ‘sustainable’ seafood, with good players rewarded with price premiums or market share and bad players punished by reduced sales. Empirically, however, retailers and brands – rather than consumers – are demanding sustainable sourcing, as part of building and protecting their reputation. Yet sustainable seafood research continues to use methods such as willingness-to-pay surveys or checkout data based on the logic of consumer demand. In this paper we develop a new logic to replace the consumer-driven one. Building on our previous research on private governance in the global tuna industry, we explore the literature from economics, marketing, consumer research, governance studies, cultural studies and supply chain management. Three interrelated ideas emerge: 1) governance is a ‘concert’ rather than the result of actions of individual actor groups; 2) green performances go beyond the prices and turnover of particular products and are aimed at improving reputation among consumers and other audiences; and 3) green performances only ‘work’ in a conducive normative context, but they also help shape norms around sustainability. We argue for new directions in research on the sustainable seafood movement focusing on: 1) audiences as influences on sustainability initiatives, and 2) the effects of sustainable seafood initiatives on norms around sustainability as part of the broader governance concert.
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  • 0976343290

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