Role of Gender in Global Fishery Value Chains: A feminist Perspective on Activity, Access and Control Profile Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/hm50tx24k

This is part of the IIFET Special Session on Markets and Value Chains for Small Aquaculture & Fisheries Enterprises with a Focus on Gender that took place on 17 July 2012 in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in conjunction with 16th IIFET Conference. The complete proceedings of this special session are available ( http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/Documents/Uploads/FileManager/IIFET%202012%20CRSP%20Session%20Proceedings%20Final_small.pdf) through the Aquaculture & Fisheries Collaborative Research Support Program gender web site, ( http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/Gender/).

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  • Women in fishing communities play multidimensional roles. Women pervade fisheries and their roles were identified as workers in both fisheries, markets, processing plants and non-fishery, mothers who give birth to successors, as caregivers of the family, as connecting agents of social networks, as representatives of local culture, as community workers and governors. The main aim of this study is to identify and measure women’s involvement in global fishery value chains and investigating their activity, access and control profiles in fishery value chains in selected destinations in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Primary data were obtained from fisheries and aquaculture operations in Thailand, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Zimbabwe and Honduras. . Participant observation with experienced investigators, focus group discussion and gender resources maps were the principal data collection tools. Women play non-significant roles in capture fishery production and totally depend on religion and culture while their contribution in aquaculture production is great. Female roles were centred on household activities which take them away from direct income generation and access to the capital assets. Less educated, resource poor women are concentrated in the low value end of the value chains while the high value end of the value chains is mainly handled by the resource rich males and limited number of educated, resourced owned females. Women’s engagement is less in modern value chains with few nodes than the traditional complex and lengthier value chains.
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  • De Silva, A., T. Bjorndal and A. Lem. Role of Gender in Global Fishery Value Chains: A Feminist Perspective on Activity, Access and Control Profile. In: Visible Possibilities: The Economics of Sustainable Fisheries, Aquaculture and Seafood Trade: Proceedings of the Sixteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 16-20, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Edited by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2012.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-12-03T23:38:37Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DeSilva.pdf: 631692 bytes, checksum: 893f196ad38b6ae564611668b99fb889 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Janet Webster(janet.webster@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-12-03T23:38:37Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DeSilva.pdf: 631692 bytes, checksum: 893f196ad38b6ae564611668b99fb889 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Janet Webster (janet.webster@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-12-03T22:53:02Z No. of bitstreams: 1 DeSilva.pdf: 631692 bytes, checksum: 893f196ad38b6ae564611668b99fb889 (MD5)

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