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Information Sharing Networks and Rates of Incidental Catch Public Deposited

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  • Pelagic fishers operate in a dynamic environment and are faced with a high level of uncertainty on a daily basis. To cope with this complexity, fishers often rely on sharing information with others in order to improve their decision making. Yet previous research has not explicitly investigated the effect of resource user’s social networks on environmental outcomes in a marine setting. Linking observer data from 2008-2012 to a complete social network dataset from Hawaii’s longline fishery, we empirically estimate the relationship between fisher’s information sharing networks and rates of incidental catch. The network exhibits strong homophily, with fishers organizing themselves into three information sharing network groups largely corresponding to their ethnic affiliation. Controlling for spatiotemporal factors, we find significant differences in shark bycatch among the three network groups. Additionally, we find that bycatch rates for individuals whose majority of ties fall outside their ethnic group are more closely aligned with their network group, rather than their ethnic group. Significant differences in shark bycatch among network groups hold when examining only reciprocal ties, which breaks the network up into several distinct components, and controlling for ethnicity. Our results indicate that some fishers may be dynamically reacting in time and space to information received from trusted sources within their network group on strategies to mitigate bycatch, while others are not. This research provides the first empirical evidence that network homophily is correlated with environmental outcomes, and that social network structure is significantly related to rates of incidental catch.
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  • Barnes-Mauthe, M., J. Lynham, K. Kolter, and P. Leung. 2014. Information Sharing Networks and Rates of Incidental Catch. In: Towards ecosystem based management of fisheries: what role can economics play?: Proceedings of the Seventeenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 7-11, 2014, Brisbane, Australia. Complied by Ann L. Shriver & Melissa Errend. Corvallis, OR: International Institute of Fisheries.
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  • Fisheries Research & Development Corporation, World Wildlife Fund, MG Kailis Group, AquaFish Innovation Lab, NOAA Fisheries, The European Association of Fisheries Economists, Japan International Fisheries Research Society, United Nations University, NORAD
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Melissa Errend (melissa.errend@gmail.com) on 2015-03-24T17:13:01Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Barnes Mauthe IIFET 286.pdf: 4272822 bytes, checksum: 4929d4065a6b4197b024e72af5211bb8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Susan Gilmont(susan.gilmont@orst.edu) on 2015-03-24T21:52:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Barnes Mauthe IIFET 286.pdf: 4272822 bytes, checksum: 4929d4065a6b4197b024e72af5211bb8 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-03-24T21:52:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Barnes Mauthe IIFET 286.pdf: 4272822 bytes, checksum: 4929d4065a6b4197b024e72af5211bb8 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2014-07-07

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