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The Economic Implications of Changing Regulations for Deep Sea Fishing under the European Common Fisheries Policy: UK Case Study Public Deposited

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Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • Economic impact assessment methodology was applied to UK fisheries data to better understand the implications of European Commission proposals for fishing for deep-sea stocks in the North-East Atlantic under the CFP. The aim was to assist the UK fishing industry and Government in evaluating the most effective options to manage deep sea fish stocks. Because of the proposed changes to the list of species defined as being deep sea species, and a new definition of what constitutes a vessel targeting deep sea species, a total of 695 active UK fishing vessels would need a permit to fish for deep sea species.  However, due to existing and capped capacity limits many vessels would potentially not be able to obtain such a permit. The economic impact of these changes reveals that in the short term, landings would decrease by 6,540 tonnes, reducing gross value added by £3.3 million. Alternative options were assesed that provide mitigation measures to offset the impacts of the proposed regulations whilst at the same time providing more effective protection of deep sea Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (VMEs). The options include setting a 400 metre depth rule beyond which vessels would potentially be classified as fishing for deep sea species and designating ‘core areas’ for deep sea fishing at depths > 400 metres to minimise the risk of bottom fishing gear on deep sea habitats. This approach would mean the impact of the proposals would essentially be reduced to zero; on average no vessels would be impacted by the proposal.
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  • 0976343290

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