Management and Value Chain of Nile Tilapia Cultured in Ponds of Small-scale Farmers in Morogoro Region, Tanzania Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/kd17cz37t

This is part of the IIFET Special Session on Markets and Value Chains for Small Aquaculture & Fisheries Enterprises with a Focus on Gender that took place on 17 July 2012 in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in conjunction with 16th IIFET Conference. The complete proceedings of this special session are available ( http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/Documents/Uploads/FileManager/IIFET%202012%20CRSP%20Session%20Proceedings%20Final_small.pdf) through the Aquaculture & Fisheries Collaborative Research Support Program gender web site, ( http://aquafishcrsp.oregonstate.edu/Gender/).

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  • A study was carried out to assess production performance and value chain of Nile tilapia grown in ponds of small-scale farmers in Morogoro region, Tanzania. Information was collected through individual interviews of 30 fish farmers. The main reasons for culturing fish were provision of animal protein food for home consumption (66.7%) and generation of income (23.3%). Fish farming contributed 10.6% of household annual income and was ranked second to crop production (50%). The majority of the farmers were fertilizing their ponds with chicken manure (30.0%) and cattle manure (23.3%). Most farmers (73.3%) cultured pure stand of Nile tilapia and only few (26.7%) practiced polyculture of Nile tilapia and African catfish. All farmers depended on natural food as a source of feed for their fish. Moreover, the farmers were feeding maize bran (96.7%), vegetables (66.7%), and kitchen leftovers (13.3%) as supplementary feeds. Men were responsible for purchasing and stocking fingerlings (60.0%), feeding (40.0%), pond maintenance (53.3%), harvesting (60.0%) and selling (43.3%). Women were mainly involved in fish processing (76.7%). The average period from stocking to harvesting was 5.75 ± 0.18 months for Nile tilapia and the mean yield was 6,946.2 kg/ha per year. About 22.2% of the harvested fish were consumed at home and the remaining (77.8%) were sold. The main actors in the value chain of cultured Nile Tilapia were fingerling producers, fish farmers and consumers. Most farmers sold fresh fish directly to neighbours (70.0%) and consumers in the local market within the village (30.0%). It is concluded that small-scale fish farming is important for provision of animal protein food and income and is done mostly by men, and it is characterized by low productivity due to improper pond fertilization and feeding. The major problems to Nile tilapia farming under small-scale fish farming is lack of funds, stunted growth of stocked fish, inadequate knowledge on fish farming and unavailability of concentrate feeds.
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  • Chenyambuga, S.W., N.A. Madalla and B.V. Mnembuka. 2012. Management and Value Chain of Nile Tilapia Cultured in Ponds of Small-scale Farmers in Morogoro Region, Tanzania. 12 pages. In: Visible Possibilities: The Economics of Sustainable Fisheries, Aquaculture and Seafood Trade: Proceedings of the Sixteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 16-20, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Edited by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, 2012.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Sebastian Chenyambuga (chenyasw@yahoo.com) on 2012-10-18T15:26:41Z No. of bitstreams: 3 Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-03-25T22:29:29Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3 Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Philip Vue(vuep@onid.orst.edu) on 2013-03-25T22:29:28Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Sebastian Chenyambuga (chenyasw@yahoo.com) on 2013-03-22T16:15:20Z No. of bitstreams: 3 Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5) Chenyambuga-IFFET paper July 201.pdf: 67414 bytes, checksum: 00e7b2432a2807656faaa33be26acb1e (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Rejected by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu), reason: Ignore this message. We had to reject this and resubmit in order for the reviewer to see this. on 2013-03-22T16:14:12Z (GMT)

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