The Economic Geography of Scallop Fishing: Concentration and Competition in the Ocean Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/mw22v739v

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • Geographers and regional scientists have long recognized that "near things are more related than distant things." Ports located far from each other may compete through use of the same fishing grounds. We describe trends in competition in the Northeast U.S Sea Scallop Fishery using a Czekanowski Index over the past 18 years and examine changes in intensity of ocean use, both within- and across-ports, using relative and absolute Theil indices of spatial disproportionality. During this time period, spatially delineated regulations have become increasingly important in the scallop fishery. The scallop fishery is currently managed with a combination of input controls (Days-at-Sea) and rotational closures; areas of the ocean with high concentrations of small scallops which remain closed until they grow larger. Notably, in 2001-2003 and 2008-2010 most of the rotational closures were in the north, while in 2006 most of the rotational closure areas were in the south. We find an increase in competition between Atlantic City, NJ and the other major ports in 2008 and 2009; we interpret this as a relocation of fishing activity to the Mid-Atlantic when the northern rotational areas were closed. The indicators provide a method of quantifying overlap in fishing activity that could be used to better understand implications of regulatory and environmental change in regional fishing economies. Finally, taking cues from the political science literature, we explore the suitability of the Czekanowski index as a measure of nearness in the context of spatial analysis and spatial econometrics.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by IIFET Student Assistant (iifetstudentassistant@gmail.com) on 2017-03-08T22:40:49Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Lee420ppt.pdf: 4573496 bytes, checksum: 440f6339ec41a4741e0bfccab60ad2f9 (MD5)
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  • 0976343290

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