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The Emerging Dominance of Aquaculture: Implications for Trade and Management Public Deposited

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IIFET 2008 Vietnam keynote presentation by Professor James L. Anderson from the University of Rhode Island, USA.

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  • There are only three fundamental sources for increasing seafood supply: 1) better management and utilization of wild fish stocks, 2) aquaculture and 3) aquaculture-enhanced 'wild' fisheries. However, nearly all significant growth in global seafood harvest and international trade over the past two decades has, and in the future will, come from aquaculture – either directly or indirectly. This has important implications for fisheries management and the international marketplace. The potential for growth and improved efficiency in the aquaculture sector is tremendous. This is just the beginning. As the aquaculture industry grows, uncertainty in quantity and price will likely decline relative to that found in the wild fishery sector – aquaculture will gain market share. However, poorly defined property rights and the legacy of poor governance associated with fisheries and the coastal zone are undermining the development of the aquaculture sector in many regions. Examples can be seen in developed countries such as the USA (ex., offshore aquaculture or Alaska finfish culture), as well as many developing counties (ex., most of Africa). Nations that address these management issues will gain market share and benefit from potential new sources of wealth for those dependent on seafood industries. As aquaculture continues to play an increasing role in the global seafood economy, technological change will evolve making aquaculture more competitive, resulting in international trade growth, improved marketing/distribution systems, more efficient resource utilization, and new market development. It will also drive change in fisheries management. Without change, traditional fisheries (even major fisheries) will be increasingly marginalized. This is occurring today in the US salmon and shrimp industries. These sectors are asking for government relief with increasing frequency just for basic survival – the rents from the fishery are gone. The evidence suggests these industries are much less economically resilient (and perhaps less sustainable) than their aquaculture-based competitors. Given these changes, how should the role of fisheries managers change? Which species, sectors or countries will likely dominate the future? Who wins?
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  • Anderson, James L. 2008. The Emerging Dominance of Aquaculture: Implications for Trade and Management. In: Proceedings of the Fourteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade, July 22-25, 2008, Nha Trang, Vietnam: Achieving a Sustainable Future: Managing Aquaculture, Fishing, Trade and Development. Compiled by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, 2008.
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  • US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries Division, The Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada; Aquaculture CRSP and AquaFish CRSP; Minh Phu Seafood Corporation; Vietnam Datacommunication Company (VDC); Camau Frozen Seafood Processing Import Export Corporation (Camimex); Long Sinh Limited Company; Mai Linh Group and Nam Viet Corporation.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-02-04T17:11:13Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Anderson.pdf: 2073894 bytes, checksum: e845cff1454d8f79be7365c808dc9956 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2008
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