Social Class Differentiations and the Regulation of Coastal Resources in New Zealand Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/ng451j76j

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  • Indigenous fishing rights are partially recognized via allocation of commercial quota rights to tribes. Concern exists, however, that the allocation of commercial quota rights to indigenous groups without restrictions on how the benefits from quota holdings can be allocated and exchanged will lead to class segregation within indigenous groups. Scholars writing about indigenous fishing rights in New Zealand, where tribal quota ownership and exchange is less regulated than in North America, have expressed concern that a “tribal capitalism” is emerging, whereby tribal elites accumulate wealth at the expense of local fishers, ostensibly the intended beneficiaries of tribal quota holdings. This paper examines the extent to which exchange of quota and coastal resources influences social class differentiation in New Zealand’s South Island, home to some of the nation’s most economically productive Maori fishing enterprises. Drawing on ethnographic data, it becomes clear that tribal quota holdings are not the driver effecting how benefits from resources are distributed. Rather, differential regulation between upstream and downstream coastal resources effects how wealth is accumulated in the watershed, patterns that largely fall along racial lines. Those who own private property, primarily non-Maori, are less regulated in their wealth accumulation than Maori who historically were pushed to the coasts, historic injustices indigenous fishing rights are designed to address. This analysis refocuses responsibility away from indigenous communities and onto the government’s regulatory practices, indicating that upstream regulation, as opposed to additional restrictions on tribal resource rights, will likely lead to more equitable distribution of coastal resource benefits.
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  • Bodwitch, Hekia. 2015. Social Class Differentiations and the Regulation of Coastal Resources in New Zealand. In: Proceedings of the Eighth Biennial Forum of the North American Association of Fisheries Economists, May 20-22, 2015, Ketchikan, Alaska: Economic Sustainability, Fishing Communities and Working Waterfronts. Compiled by Ann L. Shriver and Melissa Errend. North American Association of Fisheries Economists, Corvallis, Oregon, USA, 2015.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Susan Gilmont(susan.gilmont@orst.edu) on 2015-10-21T15:35:11Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Bodwitch NAAFE 2015.pdf: 3042817 bytes, checksum: 0167171b1b4c959491d7dd5fa2b81637 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2015-10-21T15:35:11Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Bodwitch NAAFE 2015.pdf: 3042817 bytes, checksum: 0167171b1b4c959491d7dd5fa2b81637 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-05
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Melissa Errend (melissa.errend@gmail.com) on 2015-10-20T20:45:42Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Bodwitch NAAFE 2015.pdf: 3042817 bytes, checksum: 0167171b1b4c959491d7dd5fa2b81637 (MD5)

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