Trade Data Analysis: A Tool for Improved Transparency and Management of South African Abalone (Haliotis middae) Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/p5547t23k

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Given the complex and often opaque nature of seafood supply chains, port cities can serve as checkpoints within supply chains to address illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) seafood commodities. Harmonized systems (HS) codes are used at port cities by customs officials to monitor commerce. Concern about IUU activity in capture fisheries has focused attention on the role of HS codes in identifying data discrepancies between trading nations. Only 9.9% of the HS codes, however, are resolved at the “species” level, complicating efforts to deter illegal trade and improving product traceability.  To illustrate the useful role of species level HS codes, we evaluated the trading patterns of South African abalone (Haliotis middae) listed and delisted to/from Appendix III of CITES in 2007 and 2010, respectively. Trade data from the International Trade Commission (ITC) was used to analyze trading patterns of H. middae between Hong Kong (HK) and sub-Saharan African nations. Trade data analysis from 2002 to 2015 revealed 1) increased volume of product received in HK, 2) increased dried product over frozen or fresh, and 3) increased trade volume from outside South African borders. In comparison to stable patterns prior to 2007 during an era of higher enforcement, post 2007 trends are suggestive of IUU activity of H. middae and the need for greater scrutiny to prevent illegal trading. This study illustrates that improved HS codes can strengthen Trade Data Analysis (TDA) for identifying IUU products and improve traceability and transparency of seafood traded from developing to developed countries.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Created
Date Issued
Conference Name
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by IIFET Student Assistant (iifetstudentassistant@gmail.com) on 2017-03-14T22:46:25Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Ahlers339poster.pdf: 212601 bytes, checksum: 4ee653f46352a08a680eb292faf3bf58 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2017-03-14T22:46:25Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Ahlers339poster.pdf: 212601 bytes, checksum: 4ee653f46352a08a680eb292faf3bf58 (MD5)
ISBN
  • 0976343290

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/27/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items