Changing Aboriginal Policy in Canada, and the Effects on Scale and Capacity Use in the Commercial Fisheries of Quebec Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/pc289p69c

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  • The efficiency analysis literature has long acknowledged the difference between program/policy effects and relative efficiency effects. The use of incentive compatible policy has been an important research agenda for fisheries economists, and Canada uses an array of policies and regulatory tools to fulfill the objectives of their Fisheries Act. One important policy change, beginning in the 90s was aimed at having a more equitable distribution of Aboriginal access to various fisheries. In Canada, these policies came in the wake of two Supreme Court decisions, which aimed to expand the involvement of aboriginal groups in marine fisheries. We use available data provided by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) to examine localized effects of various programs of the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy on the performance of fleets on the North Shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary. While there has been a steady growth of the Aboriginal share of the fishery over time, a closer examination reveals that there may still be important differences in technical efficiency between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal (NA) operating units, despite important investments in education and other infrastructure. Part of these differences may be due to differences in industrial organization, a relative lack of skilled labor among Aboriginals, and Canadian fisheries policies themselves. In certain cases, license transfer policies to Aboriginals may have led to losses in productive efficiency. In other cases license transfers may have resulted in Aboriginal groups simply hiring back displaced non-Aboriginal workers. The implications of these results are discussed.
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  • Wilson, J. et al. Changing Aboriginal Policy in Canada, and the Effects on Scale and Capacity Use in the Commercial Fisheries of Quebec. Visible Possibilities: The Economics of Sustainable Fisheries, Aquaculture and Seafood Trade: Proceedings of the Sixteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 16-20, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Edited by Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2012.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Janet Webster(janet.webster@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-11-07T20:15:51Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Changing aboriginal policy in Canada IIFET 2012 V3.pdf: 214614 bytes, checksum: 65ae392831f0ff61afaf420390a7d9c1 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by James Wilson (j.r.wilson1000@gmail.com) on 2012-11-03T18:49:03Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Changing aboriginal policy in Canada IIFET 2012 V3.pdf: 214614 bytes, checksum: 65ae392831f0ff61afaf420390a7d9c1 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-11-07T20:15:51Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Changing aboriginal policy in Canada IIFET 2012 V3.pdf: 214614 bytes, checksum: 65ae392831f0ff61afaf420390a7d9c1 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012

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