Immediate Need of Managing Blue Swimmer Crab Resource off Northern Sri Lanka for a Sustainable Industry Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/pg15bg886

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • After 2008, in the post-war context of northern Sri Lanka, the Blue swimming crab (BSC), Portunus pelagicus, fishery is U68blooming and becoming an export-oriented industry. Presently the major concern of BSC industry is how long this resource could sustainably utilized, if fishery continuous with current increasing exploitation rates. Hence, present status of BSC resource and fishery were evaluated. Biological data were collected drawing weekly random samples from commercial catches from November 2014 to December 2015. Catch records from 2005 to 2015 were collected from fish-collectors' log-books. Threats and issues on the BSC industry were analysed through personal interviews; semi-structured questionnaires; direct-observations and group-discussions by covering 90% of randomly selected stakeholders: fishers; processers; collectors, exporters, scientist etc. Catchers obtained from many fishing grounds in the region consist of significantly higher amount of small carbs (<100g). During January-March very small individuals, which are smaller than the estimated length at 50% maturity (L50), 7.68cm carapace width (62g in weight), were dominated in catchers. The open-access and common-property rights have triggered ~70-times increased fishing effort during last 10-years mainly leading to growth overfishing. Moreover, poaching by fishermen of neighbouring countries impose high pressure on both the resource and the industry leading to wrong estimates of fishing effort and subsequently maximum-sustainable yield. Fishery needs to be managed immediately prioritising threats and issues identified in this study. The correct choice of management may require co-management and community-based management recognition or implementation of locally based fishing rights, which is common in Sri Lankan coastal fisheries.
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  • 0976343290

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