Conference Proceedings Or Journal

 

The I, the T, or the Q? Disentangling the effects of individual transferable quotas on the health of fish stocks Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/q237hx921

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • A growing practice in fisheries management is the allocation access rights to marine fisheries through individual transferable quota (ITQs) – limits on the amount of fish allocated to individual licences as transferable permits. By establishing an ownership claim over the right to fish and a market for exchange, ITQs are purported to provide a conservation incentive that reduces or eliminates overfishing while increasing economic efficiency. Yet despite enthusiastic support for ITQs as a conservation tool, the connection between ITQs and stewardship remains a theory in need of validation. Where research has found that ITQs outperform non-ITQ fisheries in protecting against overfishing, this has been demonstrated through problematic control groups that cover a wide range of systems including unregulated fisheries. As ITQ systems are a collection of management features, there is a lack of understanding of which attribute is associated with positive outcomes – the I, the T, or the Q. This paper explores this question through a statistical analysis of 150 fisheries from around the world, documenting their changes in fisheries management system (e.g. ITQ, IQ, quota pool, effort-based) and the health of the corresponding fish stocks (e.g. fishing mortality, biomass). The results indicate that a more nuanced view of ITQs and conservation incentives is required as ITQs are neither necessary nor sufficient to deliver positive environmental outcomes. An understanding of ITQs/catch shares and other allocation systems as a combination of design attributes would greatly improve debates surrounding fisheries management.
Resource Type
Date Issued
Conference Name
Conference Location
  • Seattle, Washington, USA
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

In Collection:

Items